Marta L. Maxwell: Native Wonderland and
Susan Woods: Drawings

Corrine Woodman Gallery I | Nov 7 – Dec 9, 2017

  • Conversation from the Corrine Woodman Gallery: Thursday, November 9 at noon

Marta Maxwell is showing “soft sculpture”. Soft Sculptures are three-dimensional objects, not intended as toys made from fiber materials, in Maxwell’s case: felt. Although their feel is soft, it does not mean that these sculptures are saccharine, or sentimental. Maxwell draws her inspiration mostly from nature and Native American culture, and her work has a certain fierceness, as well as in an eerie realism.

Marta says “Ever since I was a child I have loved to make things. Whether it was making a fort in the field out of wild grasses or creating a piece of art using whatever art supplies I had on hand. I would find a way to let my imagination loose. Now over the years having worked with many mediums including clay, paint, wood, fabric etc. I have come to find my passion in wanting to work with wool. I began this magical journey about 3 ½ years ago. I had been looking something up on the internet about sewing and needle felting popped up! I just had to try it!

Since that time I have made many different sculptures some whimsical and others more serious but all consist mainly of my love for wildlife, my spiritual beliefs and visions. I have also made felted vessels and designed and made wet felted moccasins along with other articles of clothing. Currently I have taught myself how to make wet felted paintings incorporating needle felting to add detail and a two (three?) dimensional effect. I have found no limits working with wool, soft and versatile, that’s what I love about it!” 


Susan Woods is an artist/affiliate of CEI ArtWorks. She has been creating intuitive drawings with marker ink on paper. The work is non-representational, black and white; the lines are tentative interspersed with more decisive looking dense shapes. Woods uses a variety of black sharpies; even within that limitation of just black Woods is making many decisions on where a particular drawing is going.

Some forms give a hint of a figure, but Woods work is really about mark-making. Even within the more solid shapes, we see a different use of line, more or less dense to create the intensity of solid black, or a lighter version. Her work has a certain magic to it, exactly because there is no representation of objects and the tentative feel of her lines.

Susan Woods

Susan Woods